HealthCare.gov blog

Published onAugust 24, 2017

How to tell if your health insurance has started

Once you enroll in a Marketplace plan, you must pay your first
premium
to your health insurance company – not the Health Insurance Marketplace® – so your medical coverage can begin. If you’ve already paid your premium, you can check if your health insurance is active online or in your plan materials to make sure your health insurance has started:

Published onAugust 17, 2017

What documents to submit to confirm your Special Enrollment Period

If you applied for Marketplace coverage through a 
Special Enrollment Period
, you may need to submit documents to confirm you qualify. After you pick a plan, you have 30 days to send the documents.

Published onAugust 10, 2017

Don't worry: Marketplace insurance covers pre-existing conditions

Did you know that no insurance plan can reject you, charge you more, or refuse to pay for
essential health benefits
for a pre-existing condition?

Published onAugust 3, 2017

5 facts about Special Enrollment Periods

For most people, the deadline to enroll in a 2017 health insurance plan has passed. But you may still be able to enroll in health coverage for the rest of 2017 if you qualify for a 
Special Enrollment Period
.

Published onJuly 20, 2017

Can you enroll in health insurance right now?

When big changes happen in life, like if you have or adopt a baby, move, or get married, you may be able to enroll in Marketplace health insurance for the rest of 2017 with a Special Enrollment Period.

Published onJuly 6, 2017

Submit documents to confirm your Special Enrollment Period

If you applied for Marketplace coverage through a 
Special Enrollment Period
because you moved or lost other health coverage, you may be asked to submit documents to confirm you qualify.

Published onJune 29, 2017

4 steps to find the right doctor for you

Most health plans give you the best deal on services when you see a doctor who has a contract with your health plan. You may be able to see doctors who don’t contract with your plan, but visiting an "in-network" provider usually means you'll have lower out-of-pocket costs.