If you didn’t have health coverage for all or part of 2014, you have to either qualify for a health coverage exemption or pay a fee with your federal income tax return.

Find out if you qualify for an exemption and learn how to apply.

SEE IF ANY 2014 EXEMPTIONS WORK FOR YOU

To find out if any health coverage exemptions apply to you, select the button below. We’ll ask you a few questions and show you all exemptions that may work for you.

You may pay a fee if you didn’t have health coverage or an exemption in 2014

If you could have afforded health insurance in 2014 but chose not to buy it -- and don’t qualify for a health coverage exemption -- you may have to pay a fee with your federal tax return.

If you had any kind of qualifying health coverage in 2014, you don’t have to pay the fee for the months you were covered by it. See what kinds of coverage count.

The fee is based on your income and how many months you didn’t have coverage. Generally, the higher your income and the more months you didn’t have health insurance, the higher the fee.

Fees if you didn’t have coverage in 2014

If you didn’t have health coverage for all of 2014, you’ll pay the higher of:

  • An amount that depends on your income. Generally it’s 1% of your yearly household income above a certain amount — $10,150 for an individual, $20,300 for a married couple filing jointly.
  • $95 per person who didn’t have coverage ($47.50 per child under 18). The maximum fee per family using this method is $285.

Get details about the payment from the IRS, including examples of the fee based on your income.

You don’t have to pay the fee if you get a health coverage exemption

If you can claim a health coverage exemption, you won’t have to pay the fee for not having coverage.

Answer a few questions and we’ll show you all exemptions that may apply to you.