If you have insurance from a job (or a family member’s job), you're considered covered under the health care law and don’t have to pay the penalty that uninsured people must pay.

FYI:

Reporting your job-based insurance If you had job-based health insurance in 2015, you’ll need to report that you had coverage on your federal tax return. You may get Form 1095-B or 1095-C in the mail.

Enrolled in coverage through the SHOP Marketplace? The SHOP Marketplace doesn’t provide 1095 tax forms. For questions about your 1095 tax forms, contact your employer or your insurance company for assistance.

Learn about these forms and how to report job-based coverage on your tax return.

Changing to a Marketplace plan

If you have job-based coverage, you might be able to change to a Marketplace plan. But you probably won’t qualify for a premium tax credit or other savings. As long as the job-based plan is considered affordable and meets minimum standards, you won’t qualify for savings. Most job-based plans meet these standards.

Learn about changing to a Marketplace plan.

Cancelling a Marketplace plan when you get a job-based insurance offer

If you have a Marketplace plan and then get an offer of health insurance through a job, you’re probably no longer eligible for any savings on your Marketplace plan. This is true even if you don’t accept the job-based coverage offer.

You may want to cancel your Marketplace plan for yourself and anyone else in your household eligible for the new job-based coverage.

Learn how to end a Marketplace plan when you get a job-based plan.

More information about job-based insurance

Your rights, protections, and benefits for job-based coverage

The health care law provides important new rights, consumer protections, and benefits that apply to most job-based insurance plans.